Rhetorical strategies cheat sheet ap language

Ap lang graphic organizer

The effect is to highlight the disparity in an effort to heighten the sense of terror, panic, and an ominous foreboding in the reader. Remember, people are typically moved in the end by their emotions but only after a strong logical argument has laid the foundation for their change in attitude. The speaker is seen as one of us. If there is no answer, the speaker is aware of the lack of an answer and uses that lack to highlight the flaw in the opposing viewpoint. An auditory stimulus. Pun: a play on the meaning of words; a mender of soles Julius Caesar Irony: the speaker means something other than what is said; the unexpected; a difference between what is stated to be literally true and what the reader knows to be true Hyperbole: exaggeration; deliberate exaggeration for emphasis; Im so hungry I could eat a horse! The shift may indicate irony, a deeper and more complex understanding of the topic, a new way of addressing the topic, etc. Pathos: appeals to the emotions of the reader and needed if the purpose of the speaker is to incite action. Tone: the accumulated and implied attitude toward the subject reached by analyzing diction, detail, syntax, and all other figurative language elements. This will tie to the argument or point of view perhaps highlighting a change in position. Notice how and why the tone shift occurs and utilize two contrasting tone words to express the change and its effect.

Synecdoche: one word that makes the reader think of all things in the class, so all hands on deck refers to all helpers Metonymy: designation of one thing with something closely associated with it.

The speaker is seen as one of us. Chiasmus: grammatical structure when the first clause or phrase is reversed in the second, sometimes repeating the same words. The opposite may also happen with a cumulative sentence where the emphasis is on the action of the sentence and not the subject.

ap language and composition essay tips

Related Interests. Juxtaposition: the placing of contrasting settings, characters, or other literary elements in opposition between paragraphs or between sections of text to highlight an intended disparity.

ap language worksheets

Euphemism: an inoffensive expression that is substituted for one that is considered offensive or harsh: Passing on or kick the bucket in reference to a death. Asyndeton: conjunctions are omitted, producing fast-paced and rapid prose to speed up the reader so as to have the reader experience the events along with the persona in a rapid succession: I woke up, got out of bed, pulled on my clothes, rushed out the door.

Key Terms from Rhetorical Triangle Subject: other than the general topic identify the central thesis of the work in one clear declarative thesis statement. Tone: the accumulated and implied attitude toward the subject reached by analyzing diction, detail, syntax, and all other figurative language elements.

Ap language review packet

The obvious answer is, No, because no one wants to pay more in taxes. This will tie to the argument or point of view perhaps highlighting a change in position. Obvious answer to a rhetorical question: Do any of you want higher taxes? Anaphora: - a form of a regular repetition of the same word or phrase at the beginning of successive phrases or strategically placed paragraphs: I have a dream Repetition in general: repeated use of words, phrases, or clauses to emphasize its meaning Loose or periodic sentences: placing the subject at the end of the sentence: Walking down the street, I saw the cat. Asyndeton: conjunctions are omitted, producing fast-paced and rapid prose to speed up the reader so as to have the reader experience the events along with the persona in a rapid succession: I woke up, got out of bed, pulled on my clothes, rushed out the door. Diction: analyze only unusual word choice such as archaic language or especially evocative choices that contain powerful connotations Parallelism: a set of similarly structured words, phrases, or clauses: He walked to the store; he walked to the library; he walked to the apartment. Purpose or intention: to persuade, entertain, inform, etc. Purpose or intention: to persuade, entertain, inform, etc.
Rated 7/10 based on 9 review
Download
Teaching Rhetoric